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What Works Best in Education: The Politics of Collaborative Expertise

By: John Hattie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Pearson Edition: June, 2015.Description: 38 pages.Subject(s): LwDT Resources | LwDT | FacilitatorsOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: It is rare – too rare – for academics to be involved in both the battle for ideas and the day-to-day task of changing what goes on in real schools. John Hattie is an exception, someone who can link his extraordinary mastery of the evidence base with the insights he has gained through working with hundreds of schools under the Visible Learning banner. That’s a rare expertise, and one that is on full display here. In a companion paper (What Doesn’t Work in Education: The Politics of Distraction), John set out a long list of policy prescriptions which, he argues, are unlikely to have the impact we are looking for. This is that every student, irrespective of where they are starting from, makes at least a year’s worth of progress for a year’s worth of input. John’s objective in this paper is to set out how we can achieve this goal. His starting point is that the variability between schools in most Western countries is far smaller than the variability within schools, or, more simply, that it matters much more which classroom you go to than which school. Which takes us directly to the question of how to increase the expertise of all teachers . . .
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It is rare – too rare – for academics to be involved in both the battle for ideas and the day-to-day task of changing what goes on in real schools. John Hattie is an exception, someone who can link his extraordinary mastery of the evidence base with the insights he has gained through working with hundreds of schools under the Visible Learning banner. That’s a rare expertise, and one that is on full display here.

In a companion paper (What Doesn’t Work in Education: The Politics of Distraction), John set out a long list of policy prescriptions which, he argues, are unlikely to have the impact we are looking for. This is that every student, irrespective of where they are starting from, makes at least a year’s worth of progress for a year’s worth of input. John’s objective in this paper is to set out how we can achieve this goal.

His starting point is that the variability between schools in most Western countries is far smaller than the variability within schools, or, more simply, that it matters much more which classroom you go to than which school. Which takes us directly to the question of how to increase the expertise of all teachers . . .

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