Skills Matter: Further Results from The Survey of Adult Skills.

Contributor(s): Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Material type: TextTextSeries: OECD skills studies: Publisher: Paris, OECD, 2016Description: 158 pagesISBN: 9789264258044Subject(s): Adult skillsDDC classification: 302 OEC Online resources: CORE has a subscription to the OECD Education iLibrary. Contact Paula for at home access or see Subscriptions (on Koha homepage) for in office login details. Click on this link for a downloadable e-copy of the Skills Matter report. Summary: The capacity to manage information and solve problems using computers is becoming a necessity as ICT applications permeate the workplace, the classroom and lecture hall, the home, and social interaction more generally. The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to measure adults’ proficiency in several key information-processing skills, namely literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments. Adults who are highly proficient in the skills measured by the survey are likely to be able to make the most of the opportunities created by the technological and structural changes modern societies are going through. Those who struggle to use new technologies are at greater risk of losing out.
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Report Report CORE Education
302 OEC (Browse shelf) https://goo.gl/9F1rkf Available CORE0551

The capacity to manage information and solve problems using computers is becoming a necessity as ICT applications permeate the workplace, the classroom and lecture hall, the home, and social interaction more generally. The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to measure adults’ proficiency in several key information-processing skills, namely literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments. Adults who are highly proficient in the skills measured by the survey are likely to be able to make the most of the opportunities created by the technological and structural changes modern societies are going through. Those who struggle to use new technologies are at greater risk of losing out.

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